Ways To Die While Scuba Diving

Explore how diving and leading companies require continuous data, preparation, situational awareness, emotional maturity and a willingness to adapt.

Originally published on LinkedIn on Oct. 26, 2019.

Years ago when I began diving, I had originally viewed diving as blue water with whales, dolphins and gorgeous coral reef. I quickly learned how diverse diving could really be.

I was trained in cold, brown water. Like all forms of diving, cold, brown water diving requires special attention to detail. Gear for staying warm, tools for extricating myself from unplanned situations such as fishing line, vines, branches and roots, multiple lights for seeing in the dark, murky waters and very good compass navigation skills.

As I expanded my learning and experience portfolio, I came to realize the preparation and skills necessary for warm, cold, caving, cavern, blue-water, brown-water, ocean, quarry, lake and river diving may seem the same, but each and every one of them have unique requirements within themselves. What I knew yesterday helped with today, but there was always more to learn. I realized a pattern of behaviors always required: plan, execute to plan, situational awareness and prepare for adversity, always. In all cases, be disciplined before, during, after and between dives.

Diving

I enjoyed compass-diving in brown water with 0-12 inches of visibility where many times I couldn’t see my hand when fully outstretched. I loved every minute of it because I never knew for sure what was coming and I needed to be ready for anything, at any time. Blue-water diving in the ocean offered infinite views in all directions. Nothing below, beside or above me other than sunlight coming down through the water – just blue infinity. Night diving meant that sometimes, were it not for my equipment, I could easily be upside down at 100 feet thinking I was right-side-up at 35. Like all forms of diving, all three of these experiences require many of the same skills.

Diving

And like all forms of diving, in all three of these experiences, one could become disoriented and make the decision to continue doing what you’re doing, make incremental and adaptive changes, or make poor, reactive and over-corrective decisions, which make things worse immediately. Over and over again diving – and living – came down to education, experience, discipline, planning, situational awareness and the need to make informed, responsive, level-headed decisions.

As I gained more experience, I made more diverse decisions increasing risk, complexity and potential return on decisions. Which then required more experience and more on-going education. To amplify learning diversity, I began to study how divers die and sought to understand how these deaths could have been prevented.

Reasons Divers Die (listed, not rank ordered):

- Failure to plan
- Failure to maintain and improve equipment
- Failure to maintain personal health and fitness
- Failure to keep themselves in check (emotions, ego, risk-taking)
- Failure to practice/improve/increase skills and knowledge

Diving is fun, adventurous, character-building and educational. It does not have to be deadly. The National Center for Biotechnology Information and the Diver’s Alert Network reported 59 diving-related deaths in the United States in 2016. That is a small number. Yet it is 59 too many. I encourage you to explore snorkeling and scuba diving for yourself. Get educated. Be disciplined. Have fun.

Why do you believe leaders and companies fail? It would seem that companies and diving have nothing in common until we compare the lists.

Reasons Leaders and Companies Fail (listed, not rank ordered):

- Failure to plan and adapt
- Failure to maintain and improve themselves, teams and systems
- Failure to maintain and improve personal health and fitness
- Failure to keep themselves and others in check (emotions, ego, risk)
- Failure to improve skills, knowledge and experience

How would you rank this list as it relates to you? Your boss? Your company?

Like diving, leading companies and teams require continuous data and decision-making. And in order to have continuous data that enables decision-making, there needs to exist a plan, situational awareness, a data feed, a pre-meditated, cool-headed ability to make decisions and the willingness to adapt.

Plan Your Dive or Plan For Failure

- Have a plan. Continually evaluate the plan. Be prepared to change.
- Know where you are in relation to the plan. Be prepared to change.
- Continue to purposefully improve yourself, your teams and your company. 
- Practice being thoughtfully responsive versus thoughtlessly reactive.

When you’re the only diver in the water, you are welcome to make any and all bad decisions available to you. You may (or may not) be the only one that will suffer from your mistakes.

However, when you’re in the water with others who rely upon your plan, your ability to see, hear, realize and adapt to incoming data, and they trust that you are capable of making the hard decisions in hard circumstances – your preparation, emotional maturity, adaptability and decisions matter.

Early on in my journey, an old, crusty diver made a dark comment to me that stuck with me permanently and heavily influenced my preparation, maintenance and overall discipline:

“When you’re down there doing what you do and you’ve failed to plan, failed to maintain your equipment, didn’t pay attention to the information in front of you or just plain didn’t keep a cool head, just remember, at 200 feet below the surface, no one can hear you scream.”

His point? Be disciplined. Plan. Be aware. Be adaptive. Keep your head screwed on correctly. Make context-driven decisions. Live to dive again. Make sure others with you have a good experience, learn and live to dive again.

The teams at Trility regularly help people create, modify and implement plans for successful dives, gain access to data in real-time so they can adapt, as well as, equip people with the solutions they need to keep cool heads at 200 feet.

Authors Note: We’re not really going to help you plan your dives. In fact, we may never dive together. You might be crazy. I just wanted to keep the analogy going. If you want to dive, join the military, attend a commercial diving school or reach out to diver training organizations like PADI.

If you want to learn how to digitally transform your company, influence your leaders, train your teams, plan and deliver some of the dirtiest, nastiest, most complex projects from the bottom of the deepest, darkest ocean that no one else wants to do – then do call or email us.

7 “Not Easy” Steps for Securely Using Data for Real-Time Decisions

A step-by-step roadmap for taking control of your data, securing it and making it meaningful to everyone at the same time, in the same way.

Originally published on LinkedIn on Oct. 22, 2019.

Companies have data in many places. And many companies do not know what data they have, where it is stored, who and what has access to it, the trustworthiness of the data or how to organize it in a timely manner into decision criteria for leadership teams.

The easiest way to know if what I’m saying is truth is to ask someone on your technical staff to provide you an asset and access inventory. Ask them the following:

Tell me:

- All software applications used in the company
- All places data is stored in the company
- All hardware used in the company to host, edit and manage both
- Who/what has access to these things and with what levels of power

And

- How the data is secured in transit and at rest

Give them one business day. Their reaction will reveal your truth.

Running a company minimally requires two things: knowing where you want to go and having access to timely, trustworthy data that will guide your journey. This article discusses the data aspect only.

And as you may already hope, suspect or know, addressing unsecured, unmanaged, disparate applications, data and permissions is a solvable problem. Accessing one view into your company is also solvable. Let’s look at the plan.

1. Find Your Data

Inventory all software applications and data repositories inside and outside your company, as well as, anything interacting with or exchanging data with your applications and repositories.

2. Determine The State of Your Data

What is the technology collecting, managing, editing your data? Where is it hosted? By whom? Is it good, questionable or corrupt data? Who and what has access to it? What are they doing to the data? Who is managing the security and sanctity of the data? How do you know you can trust the data? Is the data current and with what frequency?

3. Secure your data

Is the data managed via role-based permissions or is it wide-open for too many people and systems to manipulate, extract and exploit? Is it direct-connect? Copy-paste? Batch-uploads? API-accessible? Is it secured while at rest? Is it secured while in transit?

Think your company not likely to be attacked, corrupted, ransomed or otherwise exploited? Consider your brand value, consumers, privacy laws and bad company press. Do people trust your brand today? Will they after a breach?

4. Establish a Common Data Format

When data originates from multiple data sources, the structure of the data is usually non-uniform. The first step is to understand the current structure and state of all data at the origination point.

The second step is to determine to what Common Data Format (CDF) all data will be funneled and/or otherwise re-organized. In other words, if your company’s growth strategy has been through Mergers and Acquisitions, you likely have many data stores with similar types of data, but with different states of sanity. If you want one view across all of these data stores, words must have the same meaning for all instances of all data. Establishing the same meaning for all similar instances is “normalization” or “establishing a Common Data Format”.

Many to one.

Only after there exists a common data format are you able to see, understand and make decisions that confidently and consistently take into consideration all parts of the company.

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5. Extract, Normalize and Put

When you understand all places from which data originates and have a CDF, your teams are then able to write predictable, repeatable and auditable methods of extracting, normalizing and putting data into your new, single source of truth.

To be clear, the methods of extracting data, normalizing data and putting data must be predictable, repeatable and auditable. And the structure into which all data is put is itself the CDF. Anything less and you will simply be creating a new mess that must be managed on top of your existing ecosystem — whatever the state.

6. Pull Data Predictably

Now that you’ve made the effort to ensure all data, from all locations, is secured and normalized, protect it. This means there must exist a predictable, repeatable and auditable manner by which applications, systems and companies access your data. Notice I didn’t say people.

To access data from the single source of truth, there must exist predictable, repeatable and auditable set of actors, permissions and activities. If there is variability in actors, permissions and activities, it will no longer be a single source of truth.

Require anyone or thing that wants access to your data to follow your rules. Non-negotiable. This includes people in Mensa, people with twenty years of tenure who have been there since the company started, the CEO’s nephew and your mom.

Your single source of truth is special. No one who wants access to the data is special. Despite what their mom told them when they were young.

7. Use Your Data to Inform Your Decisions Dynamically

Attach reporting solutions. Attach streaming solutions. Attach elastic search. Attach dashboards. Follow the rules. Enjoy peace.

Now you can trust that your data has integrity. You can trust it is secure. You can trust your data is predictable, repeatable and auditable. You can trust your company has one message.

And you can trust that you know all applications, repositories, data management and security behaviors, actors, hosting solutions and reports are something upon which you can bank your company’s reputation.

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If you would like to take control of your data, secure it and make it dynamically meaningful to everyone in your company, the teams at Trility help companies solve these challenges with a focus on predictable, repeatable and auditable behaviors. Email us at forthejourney@trility.io.